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Social Science for What

by Mark Solovey
Publisher: MIT Press
Release Date: 2020-07-07
Genre: Political Science
Pages: 408 pages
ISBN 13: 0262358751
ISBN 10: 9780262358750
Format: PDF, ePUB, MOBI, Audiobooks, Kindle

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How the NSF became an important yet controversial patron for the social sciences, influencing debates over their scientific status and social relevance. In the early Cold War years, the U.S. government established the National Science Foundation (NSF), a civilian agency that soon became widely known for its dedication to supporting first-rate science. The agency's 1950 enabling legislation made no mention of the social sciences, although it included a vague reference to "other sciences." Nevertheless, as Mark Solovey shows in this book, the NSF also soon became a major--albeit controversial--source of public funding for them.
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